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Life, Liberty, and the Firearms that protect them both

Archive for the ‘Cops’ Category

Poll: Overwhelming majority of law enforcement officers oppose new gun control

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A March 2013 survey of police officers by PoliceOne.com, the leading online resource for law enforcement, covered proposed legislation and attitudes about arming citizens.

86 percent feel the currently proposed legislation would have no effect or a negative effect on improving officer safety

Similarly, 92 percent feel that banning semi-automatic firearms, or “assault weapons,” would have no effect or a negative effect on reducing violent crime

Respondents were more split on background checks, with 31 percent agreeing that mental health background checks in all gun sales would help reduce mass shootings, while 45 percent disagreed

71 percent support law enforcement leaders who have publicly refused to enforce more restrictive gun laws within their jurisdictions

82 percent believe gun buyback or turn-in programs are ineffective in reducing the level of gun violence

91 percent support the concealed carry of firearms by civilians who have not been convicted of a felony and/or have not been deemed psychologically incapable

Likewise, 80 percent feel that legally-armed citizens would likely have reduced the number of casualties in recent mass shooting incidents

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Written by BornLib

April 9, 2013 at 2:43 pm

Posted in 2A, Cops, Second Amendment

Color Them Blind by Heather Mac Donald – City Journal

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Color Them Blind by Heather Mac Donald – City Journal.

That statement is deceptive in a number of ways. Goldstein underplays the fact that McCormack was talking about a specific robbery pattern with specific suspect descriptions from victims and witnesses; it is absurd to suggest that race be omitted from crime information given to officers about actual perpetrators. If whites had been committing the crimes, being white would have been in the suspect description that McCormack used at roll call. Further, when victims report the skin color of suspects, that’s just one factor in the determination of whom to stop for a reported crime pattern; suspicious behavior, location, and time of day are equally important, as McCormack made patently clear. Goldstein has no basis for alleging that McCormack is making it the “deciding factor.” He leans on the fact that McCormack did not spell out the behaviors that suggest that a suspect may be casing a robbery victim during his exchange with Serrano, but the inspector had already made it clear that stops were not to be indiscriminate. This was a hypothetical example, in any case, raised during the broader discussion of whether Serrano was putting enough effort into his job. The Times’s position comes down to this: If blacks are committing particular crimes, the police cannot even mention race in their suspect descriptions.

That argument means that if police target their enforcement activity at high-crime areas, they will necessarily be accused by the Times of racial profiling. The 40th Precinct is 26 percent black, but in 2011, blacks committed over 52 percent of all violent crime there, according to victims and witnesses of those crimes. Neither the Times nor the advocates have ever said what they think police stop ratios should look like in light of such crime figures. In fact, blacks made up 53 percent of all stops, 43 percent of which were made on suspicion of weapons possession. The Times’s front-page article went beyond even what the plaintiffs’ attorneys in Floyd asserted. Though attorney Jonathan Moore questioned Serrano on the stand about his heated exchange with McCormack, the focus of his questioning was to establish the existence of quotas; the race issue was at best a secondary concern.

I’ve been told that similar claims of racism are what doomed Over-the-Rhine to being abandoned by the police.  As terrible an AG as I think Holder is, I don’t think his legacy is going to be half as destructive as Janet Reno’s.

Written by BornLib

March 25, 2013 at 5:41 pm

Posted in Cops, Liberalism

“Smart guns” and dumb journalists

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Bob Owens: NY Times editorialist Joe Nocera deceives readers about ‘smart gun’ technology

There have been, for decades, attempts to create devices to keep unauthorized users from firing firearms. The overwhelming majority of these devices have been developed with the law enforcement market in mind, because of the relatively high percentage of police officers murdered with their own firearms. There have been attempts to use magnets, electronics, radio signals, micro-processors, biometrics and other devices to restrict the access of firearms to authorized users only.

They’ve been tested by manufacturers. They’ve been examined by the military, as well as deep-pocketed law enforcement agencies on the local, state, and federal level, and yet, not a single military or law enforcement agency in the United States OR THE REST OF THE WORLD uses smart gun technology to equip their rank and file.

Not any department, agency, or division.

Anywhere.

Ever.

Read the whole thing; it is a truly epic takedown.

Written by BornLib

March 25, 2013 at 3:40 pm

What a fustercluck

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Via SayUncle:

But when the smoky haze — caused by rapid fire of nearly 140 bullets in less than 30 seconds — dissipated, it soon became clear that more than a dozen officers had been firing at one another across a middle school parking lot in East Cleveland.

But wait, there’s more!

Officers recounted for investigators seeing guns, objects that looked like guns or one of the suspects loading guns in the middle school parking lot — which could not have been possible at that point in the incident. No gun was found in the car.

Now it is certainly possible that, as the article mentions, the suspects had a gun during the chase and ditched it; at this point it is my opinion that the police have a lot more wishful thinking than evidence.

Written by BornLib

February 19, 2013 at 5:24 pm

Posted in Cops, Lethal Force

The good news is…

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Written by BornLib

February 19, 2013 at 7:19 am

Posted in Cops

You don’t need to worry about self defense, the state will protect you

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Man Attacks Ex-Girlfriend Inside Ohio Courtroom Where Victim Was Seeking Order Of Protection | The Smoking Gun.

Greene and Morrow were in the Summit County courtroom for a hearing in connection with Morrow’s application this month for a restraining order against Greene, whom she has accused of making threats and abusing her.

After Magistrate Tracy Stoner briefly departed the small courtroom, Greene appears to begin yelling and gesticulating at Morrow, who sits placidly at a conference table. The video, which does not have audio, shows Greene jumping to his feet and chasing Morrow around the table.

When his grandmother tried to step in front of him, Greene shoved her into a wall. Greene then pounced on Morrow, who had stumbled to the floor. As he pummeled Morrow, Greene was confronted by a sheriff’s deputy who subdued him with the aid of a stun gun.

Even after the deputy entered the room Greene kept attacking her for five seconds before he was incapacitated with a taser.  If this had been a 911 call what would have happened to her?

Records indicate that an Akron Municipal Court judge yesterday signed a temporary protection order barring Greene from having contact with Morrow.

Temporary?

You know I would much rather see this woman become a gun owner than a crime statistic, but I guess that is what makes me a crazy redneck.

Written by BornLib

January 30, 2013 at 5:20 pm

Posted in Cops, Self defense

ATF not that good at keeping it together

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Journal Sentinel: ATF’s Milwaukee sting operation marred by mistakes, failures

But the effort to date has not snared any major dealers or taken down a gang. Instead, it resulted in a string of mistakes and failures, including an ATF military-style machine gun landing on the streets of Milwaukee and the agency having $35,000 in merchandise stolen from its store, a Journal Sentinel investigation has found.

When the 10-month operation was shut down after the burglary, agents and Milwaukee police officers who participated in the sting cleared out the store but left behind a sensitive document that listed names, vehicles and phone numbers of undercover agents.

And the agency remains locked in a battle with the building’s owner, who says he is owed about $15,000 because of utility bills, holes in the walls, broken doors and damage from an overflowing toilet.

Why is the ATF going after drugs anyway? Is this not what the DEA is for?

Written by BornLib

January 30, 2013 at 4:05 pm

Posted in Cops